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Kathleen Malley

Programmer/Policy Analyst/Data Manager

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Contact

Tate-Turner-Kuralt Building

Room 524-E

325 Pittsboro Street

Campus Box 3550

Chapel Hill, NC 27599

kmalley@unc.edu

O: 919-962-6514

http://ssw.unc.edu/ma/

Kathleen Malley earned her PhD in Educational Psychology Measurement and Evaluation as well as her master’s degree in School Counseling from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also has a BA in Psychology from the University of Virginia. Dr. Malley joined Dean Duncan’s Management Assistance Project in 2017. In this role she and her team assess individuals’ and families’ use of public assistance programs (e.g., Food and Nutrition Services, Child Welfare) in our state.

Degrees and Licenses

PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
MEd, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
BA, University of Virginia

Primary Program

Jordan Institute for Families

Research and Professional Interests

Involvement with Public Assistance Programs
Academic Outcomes and Engagement
Social/Emotional Development

Co-Investigator

Assistance in Assessing Child Welfare Outcomes
Analytical Assistance to the Food Stamp Program

Recent Publications

Day, K. M., Hamm, J. V., Lambert, K., Farmer, T. W. (2014). Social Integration and Students’ Perceptions of the Transition to Middle School. Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology, 4, doi:10.5539/jedp.v4n1p10

Hamm, J. V., Dadismann, K. A., Day, K., Agger, C., Farmer, T. W. (2014). Rural Appalachian Parents’ Pre- and Mid-Transition Expectations and Children’s Social Integration Following the Middle School Transition. Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology, 4, doi: 10.5539/jedp.v4n1p46

Day, K. (2012). Retention: “It’s just what we’ve always done”. Psychology Today: PsychEd. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/psyched/201209/retention-it-s-just-what-we-ve-always-done

Presentations, Workshops and Media

Social Connectedness: Contributions to Positive Perceptions of the Middle School Transition